Dunning-Krugger Effect

All posts tagged Dunning-Krugger Effect

I’ve come to think of the Dunning-Kruger effect as one of the foundational theories of human behavior (regrettably, including my own).  Doctor Dunning recently posted an interesting article on the topic, here

“What’s curious is that, in many cases, incompetence does not leave people disoriented, perplexed, or cautious. Instead, the incompetent are often blessed with an inappropriate confidence, buoyed by something that feels to them like knowledge.”

He continues, “A whole battery of studies conducted by myself and others have confirmed that people who don’t know much about a given set of cognitive, technical, or social skills tend to grossly overestimate their prowess and performance, whether it’s grammar, emotional intelligence, logical reasoning, firearm care and safety, debating, or financial knowledge. College students who hand in exams that will earn them Ds and Fs tend to think their efforts will be worthy of far higher grades; low-performing chess players, bridge players, and medical students, and elderly people applying for a renewed driver’s license, similarly overestimate their competence by a long shot.”

When I daughter and I discussed this, she said “oh, I understand!”… and winked.